A Few More Unusual Deaths – Inhuman Edition


Let’s talk about some more unusual deaths.  However, we’ll make these weird and probably not the result of humans (except one, but I’ll explain when I get there).

  • The movie The Exorcism of Emily Rose is based on a case of demonic possession in Germany.  Anneliese was admitted to a psychiatric facility to be treated for whatever was causing her to believe that she was demonically possessed.  After several months of treatment, the doctors were at a loss as to what was causing her symptoms.  Mentally speaking, there didn’t seem to be anything wrong with her and her symptoms, described by only one doctor, didn’t reflect any physical illness either.  Anneliese was still insisting that the problem was possession and the doctors eventually agreed to allow a Catholic priest to do an exorcism.  Sadly, the exorcism didn’t go well.  The priest spent a couple of days with Anneliese and the Church deemed the exorcism a failure.  Plans were made to try again.  However, Anneliese decided that there was just no way to dispel the demon that inhabited her.  Instead of allowing a second exorcism, she began refusing food and water.  After a month, she slipped into a coma and despite the best efforts of her doctors, Anneliese died of starvation.  This is one of the few cases where medical doctors, psychiatrists, and the Catholic Church have been in complete agreement that the only cause for the symptoms was demonic possession.  Those involved with the case rarely spoke of it and one psychiatrist who was involved in the exorcism is said to have aged almost overnight by the things he saw.  So, while Annaliese did essentially commit suicide, her suicide was brought on by demonic possession.
  • Shortly after the breaking up of the Soviet Union in 1991, a man was found in Siberia, dead.  He’d had both arms ripped off.  The cause was ruled the equivalent of Death by Misadventure.  However, it was the way in which he died that raised questions. Even though his arms were torn off, they weren’t taken.  No part of his body had been chewed up, scratched up, or showed signs of damage.  The Russians believed he had literally prodded a sleeping bear and the bear had ripped his arms off.  The area is known as yeti territory and locals believe the man ran afoul of a yeti, not a bear.
  • Mr. Adamski was a rather boring man, until he died.  While living, he was a Polish immigrant to the UK and a coal miner.  However, on 6 June 1980, he went missing during a shopping trip. Five days later, his body was found.  He’d died of a heart attack and had unusual burns marks on his body.  The time of death had been the day he was found, yet there was no evidence to suggest that Adamski had been roughing it, he’d eaten well and even shaved.  The burns were interesting because an ointment was found on them, the ointment ingredients have never been identified. Even forensic scientists were unable to figure out what it was made of.  The story might have ended there, except after he retired, the officer admitted that it looked like Adamski had fallen from the sky to where his body was found, but that he didn’t put it in the report because it sounded “crazy.”  The coroner’s inquest also took some time returning a verdict on whether it was a natural or induced heart attack.  The main medical examiner would later state that aside from the strange ointment, Adamski’s body had elevated levels of a specific hormone that indicated he had been in a heightened state of fear and he believed the man had died of fright.  Also, not put into the report was a handful of witnesses who stated they saw a UFO hover over the area where Adamski’s body was found.  The time of the sightings coincided with the time of death.
  • Roughly a decade ago, a man was found in the Gobi Desert.  His death was unusual in that the upper part of his body did not have any soft tissue left, while the bottom half did.  It was quickly cited as having been the result of exposure and that the man had died after getting lost.  Locals believe he died after running into a Mongolian Death Worm.  The worm in question is roughly three feet long, red, and lives under the sands.  It also projectile vomits acid, which can eat through anything, including metal and human flesh.  If you believe the stories, over the centuries hundreds of people have died because of the Mongolian Death Worm.  There is no documentation that the creature exists, but to those that live in and around the Gobi, the Mongolian Death Worm is aptly named.
  • A poltergeist is believed to be responsible for the next death and is the only one of its kind (that I have ever heard of).  During the 1970s a family living in California began to experience poltergeist-like activity in their home.  On a May evening, the father of the family became enraged at the spirit plaguing his house and called it out.  Reports indicate that a gallon paint can then flew from a shelf and struck the man in the head, killing him instantly.  While police really didn’t want to believe the poltergeist story, there were seven people in the home that night, including a minister.  With no evidence as to which of the six living people might have killed the man and all of them having similar stories of the events, his death was eventually labelled suspicious.  The family moved after the death of the father and reported that poltergeist activity followed them to their new home.  After about a year in the new house, all activity suddenly ceased.
  • In an even rarer case, a man in Florida during the 1990s suddenly caught fire.  He was fine one minute and the next, his arm was engulfed in flames.  What makes it one of the rarest cases of spontaneous human combustion ever is that there were witnesses (he was fishing with friends), he LIVED, and it happened more than once.  As a matter of fact, the man, who remains anonymous, was admitted to the hospital on six separate occasions during the 1990s, all of them for burns.  Once, he even caught fire in front of doctors while he was recovering from a previous fiery encounter.  No medical reason could be found for these fires and doctors swear he was not in a position to set himself on fire when they witnessed his legs suddenly begin to burn.  If the events continued into the next decade, they have not been made public.

There you have it; from yetis to spontaneous human combustion to demonic possession, there are a lot of ways to die in this world that do not involve murderers.

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